1333

Three Levels Of Management DISCUSSION AND REPLY TO MAVIS AND EDWARDS DISCUSSION AT BOTTOM

ANSWER THIS DISCUSSION 200 TO 250 WORDS
Imagine yourself as the executive manager of an organization.  You are responsible for establishing the three levels of management and how each level functions in the organization. One of the executive board members does not agree with having three levels of management. How would you justify to the executive board that three levels of management should be implemented in the organization? In your initial post, please include an explanation of the function that each level performs and why it is important.

 

 

Respond to at least two of your classmates' posts. Evaluate their discussions by agreeing, disagreeing, or adding other ideas to strengthen or enhance the perspectives presented in their initial posts.

 

RESPOND TO MAVIS'S DISCUSSION:




 

 

Three Levels of Management

Imagine yourself as the executive manager of an organization.  You are responsible for establishing the three levels of management and how each level functions in the organization. One of the executive board members does not agree with having three levels of management. How would you justify to the executive board that three levels of management should be implemented in the organization? In your initial post, please include an explanation of the function that each level performs and why it is important.

Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates' posts. Evaluate their discussions by agreeing, disagreeing, or adding other ideas to strengthen or enhance the perspectives presented in their initial posts.

In this thread, we are to act in the capacity of the executive manager and make a decision on implementing three



levels of management. In order to implement this strategic plan, there has to be a understanding of what the levels are in management.  The three levels of management are top, middle and lower managers.

Top level managers are the managers who actual are in charge of running the company and making the executive decisions. I like to think of them as the people who do not get their hands dirty. These are the people who understand the business from a high level but look for results.  The handle developing and strategizing plans and making policies.  These are the people who have to answer to the stockholders and the public (Baack, 2012).

Middle managers are the arm of management that interacts with upper management. These people are more directional and functional that the top managers.  They have a better understanding of processes.  These are the people who act as the liaison between top management and lower management.  They are responsible for



monitoring performance, resolving issues and implementing reward systems.

The lower tier of management are the people in the weeds. These are the people who know how the processes work in and out.  They manage the everyday people assign task, make sure quality work is being completed, make suggestions for change and development.  These are the people who are responsible for motivating the employees (Baack, 2012).  Performance feedback; and

I feel that it is important to segment management out into separate levels. I would provide the board member with the tasks that each of these levels work on and provide clarity as to the importance.  I would advise that every person is not a leader and all good leaders are not good at implementing and working a plan.  Roles are designed to showcase people’s strengths  which help make the organization more successful.

I often tell my brother in law who owns a company, every person is not a leader.



Some people have the strength and talent to step out and lead and designate and ensure that tasks are completed.  However, some people are just content with getting the work done and that is where their level of satisfaction lies and when you try to force them to be leaders they are not successful

 

Baack, D. (2012), Management communication, Bridgepoint Education, San Diego, CA

 

RESPOND TO EDWARDS POST:

 

Within an organization, the top-level managers can consist of chief of operations, marketing, finances, technology, executive officer, and the president. As the top-notch level of the company, their roles are to create strategies and goals for the organization that will lead them to success. Top level managers also build relationships with stakeholders and create rules and regulations for all employees to abide by. In order for all staff within the organization to know and understand the organizations



goals and policies, they are delivered to middle management through verbal and written communication.

It is then the role of middle management to deliver and enforce the company’s goals, visions, strategies, and rules to the lower level staff. Middle managers are head of a department which can include being a general or a regional manager. They communicate with each other to come up with ways to improve production while giving lower level management feedback on what is going well and what areas need to be improved. It is also the role of middle managers to send work reports and discuss other issues with uppers staff, which means they are allowed to use upward communication to give suggestions as well on what needs to be changed.

The third level of management within an organization consist of foremen, supervisors, team leaders and assistant managers. They are responsible for leading and managing the lower level staff and communicating to the middle level of management.



Their responsibilities include “coordinating daily work activities, enforcing procedures, or the instructions employees follow in completing tasks. Enforcing proper disciplinary procedures regarding behavior and making decisions about their departments’ activities, such as scheduling, giving breaks, ordering supplies, and other functions” (Bierman, Ferrell, O. C., & Ferrell, L., 2016, p. 1.1). It is then the role of the lower staff to send reports, discuss issues and give suggestions with middle management regarding lower level staff.

References

Bierman, L., Ferrell, O. C., & Ferrell, L. (2016). Management: Principles and applications, custom edition. Retrieved from


href="https://content.ashford.edu/books/Bierman.1318.16.1/sections/sec1.1" rel="noreferrer nofollow" target="_blank">https://content.ashford.edu/books/Bierman.1318.16.1/sections/sec1.1 (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Reply

 

 

 


Question Field

Asked by kimberly56
4 years ago
NO ANSWERS YET
RELATED QUESTIONS
1018 Rank 1272 Views
1438 Rank 1118 Views
 Need ASAP

Asked by kellyrobert 4 years ago

890 Rank 1176 Views
 Market Tracking

Asked by emilylevy 4 years ago

233 Rank 1144 Views
1076 Rank 1259 Views
 Accident Reporting

Asked by wroberts 4 years ago

476 Rank 1314 Views
1093 Rank 542 Views
 For Hifsa Shaukat

Asked by wwilcox 4 years ago

554 Rank 374 Views
1377 Rank 618 Views
 111

Asked by wroberts 4 years ago